Introduction

Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere (RISH), Kyoto University and LAPAN collaborate and conduct the equatorial atmospheric research for a long time. Since 2001, we have been successfully operating the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR) at Kototabang, West Sumatra, and continue the long-term observations. RISH proposes an international school for the study of the equatorial atmosphere. This event will benefit young scientists and researchers who are interested in this field to have a good summary of the study techniques and recent topics. Also, this event may help accelerate our big research project to establish the Equatorial MU Radar (EMU) that is the full-spec atmospheric radar in the near future right next to the EAR.

We invite you all

Students from Indonesia, Southeast Asian countries, Japan, others

Lecture Topics

We discuss
the equatorial atmosphere

Basics / Measurement techniques / Research topics

  • Lecture 1 Introduction and basics of the Earth’s atmosphere
    Mamoru Yamamoto (RISH, Kyoto University)

    We begin the lecture with introduction for this school event. We briefly discuss problems of the Earth’s environment. After that we discuss structure of the Earth’s atmosphere including comparisons with other planets, dynamic stability, and set of equations that governs dynamics of the atmosphere.

  • Lecture 2 Atmospheric radar basics
    Mamoru Yamamoto (RISH, Kyoto University)

    Radar is a powerful tool to study the atmosphere. This lecture aims to give basic understanding on the radars for the measurement of the atmosphere. We discuss radio-wave scattering by rain drops and atmospheric turbulence, mechanism of the radars, measurement technique, and some study examples.

  • Lecture 3 Equatorial rainfall and global climate
    Manabu D. Yamanaka (Research Institute for Humanity and Nature)

    Global climate is maintained by solar visible heating (minus parasol effect) and terrestrial infrared cooling (minus greenhouse effect), and their imbalance is compensated mainly by latent heating generated with equatorial cumulonimbus clouds. Since the equatorial atmosphere is almost free from Coriolis force making cyclones, the diurnal-cycle sea-land heat contrast is the most principal mechanism to generate cumulonimbus and thus rainfall. Unlike the extratropics with radiative cooling dominant in a clear night, the equatorial nighttime cooling is mainly by a sprinkler-like effect of rainfall itself. The earth’s longest coastline of Indonesian maritime continent generates the largest regional rainfall and latent heat controlling the global climate.

  • Lecture 4 Climate-biogeosphere-humanosphere interaction
    Manabu D. Yamanaka (Research Institute for Humanity and Nature)

    The equatorial coastal rainfall is dependent directly on sea-land heat contrast. The sea surface temperature varies through atmosphere-ocean interactions such as El Niño-southern oscillation (ENSO) over the Pacific and Indian-Ocean dipole mode (IOD) occurring respectively after and before late 2018. The land surface heating by sunshine before the noon makes the rainy season in each hemispheric summer (twice near the equator), and this (as well as nighttime cooling) is dependent on the land surface properties. The resultant rainfall sustains the biosphere, which is partly used as the humanosphere. The human activities affect the land surface as well as the greenhouse and parasol effects. An important issue is the sustainable development of the Indonesian peatland accumulating massive carbon and causing serious forest fire under less rainfall with a strong El Niño event.

  • Lecture 5/6 Atmospheric waves and coupling processes
    S Sridharan (NARL, ISRO)

    Atmospheric waves which include tides play an important role in the dynamical coupling of the atmosphere by transporting momentum and energy laterally and vertically and thereby determine the thermal structure, mean circulation, distribution of chemical constituents of the atmosphere. This talk describes different kinds of waves and tides, their source mechanisms, propagation characteristics, their interactions among themselves and with the background flow and their influence on the ionospheric variabilities. Emphasis will be given to the equatorial atmosphere, which is unique in hosting special wave motions due to absence of Coriolis force, large solar insolation and alternate distribution of sea and land mass over the equatorial belt.

  • Lecture 7/8 Hands-on training of IUGONET data analysis for promotion of atmospheric science
    Atsuki Shinbori (ISEE, Nagoya University)

    This lecture aims to introduce an overview of the IUGONET project and teach how to use the IUGONET data analysis tools (Type-A and SPEDAS) for understanding physical mechanisms of short-term and long-term variations in the Earth's atmosphere with different types of observation data.

  • Lecture 9/10 Upper atmosphere basics and observations
    Kazuo Shiokawa (ISEE, Nagoya University)

    The Earth’s upper atmosphere (mesosphere and thermosphere) is partly ionized, forming the ionosphere, which interacts with natural and artificial radio waves. Although the ionization rate is only 0.1 % of the neutral atmosphere, the ionosphere makes significant effects on the GNSS positioning and radio communications. Behavior of the ionosphere is significantly affected by the neutral atmosphere, particularly by upward-propagating atmospheric waves. This lecture aims to provide some basics of the upper atmosphere and the ionosphere as well as various techniques to measure them.

  • Lecture 11 Atmospheric radar advanced
    Hiroyuki Hashiguchi (RISH, Kyoto University)

    This lecture aims to introduce interferometry techniques using multiple antenna arrays and/or multiple frequencies to improve the angular and range resolutions of atmospheric radars. We describe the basics of the methods developed in antenna array processing and show how similar methods can also be used for rejecting interferences.

  • Lecture 12/13 GAIA Numerical simulation of the Earth’s atmosphere
    Yasunobu Miyoshi (Kyushu University)

    This lecture aims to introduce numerical models of the Earth’s atmosphere, a whole atmosphere general circulation model and an atmosphere-ionosphere coupled model (GAIA). Using these numerical models, we discuss the vertical propagations of atmospheric waves, such as tides, Rossby wave, and gravity waves, and their impacts on the thermosphere-ionosphere system.

  • Lecture 14 Atmospheric Model in Indonesia
    Nurjanna Joko T (Bandung Institute of Technology)

    Numerical model has become more common and standard way in atmospheric science. This lecture aims to introduce the numerical weather prediction models that have been used to study the atmosphere, particularly in Indonesia. The numerical simulation on result will be presented to give insight to the participant about the powerfulness of the models and at the same time their weaknesses. At the end of the lecture, the challenge of the atmospheric model development in the Maritime Continent would be an interesting subject to be discussed.

  • Lecture 15 Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS)
    Hiroyuki Hashiguchi (RISH, Kyoto University)

    This lecture aims to introduce the Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS) technique to continuously observe atmospheric temperature profiles. Sound emission system is used in combination with an atmospheric radar. The atmospheric temperature can be determined from the Doppler shift of the scattered echoes from the sound wave. We show the observation results with EAR-RASS.

  • Lecture 16 GNSS measurement of the atmosphere
    Noersomadi (RISH, Kyoto University / LAPAN)

    This lecture will present an introduction to the GNSS remote sensing of the atmosphere including the history, basic principle, and its application for weather and climate studies. The two primary methods are 1) collecting GNSS signals at the ground-based receiver to measure the total precipitable water vapor called GNSS PWV; and 2) retrieving the GNSS signals onboard low Earth orbit (LEO) receiver for profiling the atmosphere called GNSS radio occultation (GNSS-RO). This lecture will emphasize on the atmospheric study using high vertical resolution by GNSS-RO.

  • Lecture 17 Introduction of numerical simulation technique for atmosphere
    Tatsuhiro Yokoyama (RISH, Kyoto University)

    Recent advances of computer hardware enable us to conduct numerical simulation more easily. One laptop PC is equivalent to a 20-year-old world-class supercomputer. The numerical simulation of atmospheric physics is a part of computational fluid dynamics (CFD), which has a wide variety of application in science and engineering. This lecture provides a very brief introduction of numerical simulation techniques to step forward in the atmospheric simulation field.

Mamoru Yamamoto
lecturer 01

Mamoru Yamamoto
RISH, Kyoto University

Introduction and basics of the Earth’s atmosphere
Atmospheric radar basics

lecturer 02

Hiroyuki Hashiguchi
RISH, Kyoto University

Atmospheric radar advanced
 

lecturer 03

Kazuo Shiokawa
ISEE, Nagoya University

Upper atmosphere basics and observations
 

Manabu Yamanaka
lecturer 04

Manabu D. Yamanaka
Research Institute for Humanity and Nature

Equatorial rainfall and global climate Climate biogeosphere humanosphere interaction

Tatsuhiro Yokoyama
lecturer 05

Tatsuhiro Yokoyama
RISH, Kyoto University

Introduction of numerical simulation technique for atmosphere
 

lecturer 06

Yasunobu Miyoshi
Kyushu University

GAIA Numerical simulation of the Earth’s atmosphere
 

lecturer 07

Nurjanna Joko T
Bandung Institute of Technology

Atmospheric Model in Indonesia

Atsuki Shinbori
lecturer 08

Atsuki Shinbori
ISEE, Nagoya University

Hands-on training of IUGONET data analysis for promotion of atmospheric science

Noersomadi
lecturer 09

Noersomadi
RISH, Kyoto University / LAPAN

GNSS measurement of the atmosphere

Sridharan
lecturer 10

S Sridharan
NARL, ISRO

Atmospheric waves and coupling processes
 

March 2019 AM1 (90min)
8:30-10:00
AM2 (90min)
10:30-12:00
PM1 (90min)
13:30-15:00
PM2 (90min)
15:30-17:00
18th (Mon) Opening/Lecture 1
Earth’s atmosphere basic of atmospheric dynamics
Mamoru Yamamoto
Lecture 2
Atmospheric radar basics
Mamoru Yamamoto
Lecture 3
Equatorial rainfall and global climate
Manabu D. Yamanaka
Lecture 4
Climate-biogeosphere-humanosphere interaction
Manabu D. Yamanaka
19th (Tue) Lecture 5
Atmospheric wave and coupling processes (1)
S Sridharan
Lecture 6
Atmospheric wave and coupling processes (2)
S Sridharan
Lecture 7
IUGONET data analysis for promotion of atmospheric science (1)
Atsuki Shinbori
Lecture 8
IUGONET data analysis for promotion of atmospheric science (2)
Atsuki Shinbori
20th (Wed) Lecture 9
Upper atmosphere Basics
Kazuo Shiokawa
Lecture 10
Upper Atmosphere Observations
Kazuo Shiokawa
Lecture 11
Atmospheric radar advance
Hiroyuki Hashiguchi
Poster Session
21st (Thu) Lecture 12
GAIA Numerical simulation of the Earth’s atmosphere (1)/Inside of GAIA
Yasunobu Miyoshi
Lecture 13
GAIA Numerical simulation of the Earth’s atmosphere (2)/Inside of GAIA
Yasunobu Miyoshi
Lecture 14
Atmospheric Model in Indonesia
Nurjanna Joko T
Lecture 15
Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS)
Hiroyuki Hashiguchi
22nd (Fri) Lecture 16
GNSS measurement of the atmosphere
Noersomadi
Lecture 17
Introduction of numerical simulation technique for atmosphere
Tatsuhiro Yokoyama
Closing Session

23

January

2019

  • Application Submission Deadline : January 28th 2019

01

February

2019

  • Notification of Acceptance : February 04th 2019 (New Update)

15

February

2019

  • Registration Deadline

18

March

2019

  • International School Started
Requirements

Requirements for Submission :

  • Researchers and/or Students
  • Having high interest and experienced on Atmospheric Sciences and Modelling, Radar Observations, and Atmospheric Data Processing
  • Submitting an abstract related to the topics of ISQUAR (250 words)

Requirements for Recommendation Letter :

  • Addressed to the Organizer of ISQUAR 2019
  • Consist of maximum 300 words
  • Issued by institution/office/university (letter must be included letterhead, stamp, and signature of the chairman of study programme (for students) or head of the institution/unit workplace (for employees).

Requirements for Motivation Letter :

  • Consist of maximum 500 words
  • Stated motivation/reasons and topics of interest in ISQUAR 2019
  • Stated the educational background and/or current occupation

Requirements for Travel Support :

  • We provide travel support for researchers and/or students who want to participate in this event.
  • Upload a file (.pdf) that informs us about :
    • Name
    • University / Institution
    • Position (example : researcher, student, etc)
    • Work Address

Additional Informations :

  • Hotel & Travel Support Available *)Terms and Conditions Apply
  • Lunch provided

 

*) All Documents save in pdf format file.

RISH ARN Kyoto
LAPAN PUI RISTEK
ISEE JSPS Nagoya